What obeyed in this experiment? Explain your answer,

What is the likely dominant mechanism of heat transfer
from the room-temperature environment to the cup of liquid nitrogen?

-The Styrofoam cup is the dominant mechanism of heat
transfer from the room-temperature environment to the liquid nitrogen. It
transfers heat a slow rate.

 

What effect does condensation (frost on the walls of the
Styrofoam cup) have on the results?

-An effect the condensation will have on the result is
increase in weight and cause of error in data. In the procedure it says to wipe
down the frost and the digital scale, so it does not increase the weight or
cause any error when doing the next procedure.

 

You should have noticed that the value of the fit
parameter C did not turn out as expected. Reflect on the behaviour of the
exponential decay to provide an explanation that is consistent with the result
that you obtained for C.

-The value of the fit parameter of C did not turn out as
predicted because of error and time. One error that cause this is if the
experiment is not in a stable condition this can cause error in the behaviour
of the exponential decaying graph. Another issue can be time, I had to reset my
exponential graph twice because my data got deleted.

 

Predict how the decay curve would evolve if the experiment
was monitored until all the liquid nitrogen had evaporated. What would the
value of the fit parameter C converge to at this time?

-I predict that the decaying curve would take a very long
time for the entire liquid nitrogen to evaporate. I predict that the decaying
curve would be linear instead of exponential because liquid nitrogen does not
evaporate very fast. The value of the fit parameter C will converge at this
time would be like figure 3 C value.

 

 

Is Newton’s Law of Cooling obeyed in this experiment?
Explain your answer, taking into consideration the various forms of heat
exchange affecting the experiment.

If the experiment obeyed Newton’s Law of Cooling than the
graphs would’ve been more exponential than linear graphs.