The Story of an Hour and The Necklace

From the nineteenth century to the middle of the twentieth century, being a woman meant being a housewife. Once a woman married, the husband owned the woman’s property and money. The only rights they had were to stay home, do the housework and care for a husband or children. They were considered a half of a human being. Women may not have liked it but they were forced to live this way. The men were the head of the household and made every decision. The representation of ‘The Necklace’ and “The Story of an Hour” symbolizes gender roles as defined by the nineteenth century.

Kate Chopin is an American writer best known for her stories about the inner lives of sensitive, daring women(http://www.katechopin.org/the-story-of-an-hour/). Her short stories were received in the 1890’s and were published by some of Americas most well-known magazines such as; Vogue, The Atlantic Monthly, Harpers Young People, The Youths Companion, and The Century. One of her most popular stories was called “The Story of an Hour”. It was written on April 19, 1894, under the name “The Dream of an Hour”. It’s about the thoughts of a young women after she is told her husband has died in an accident. Kate was raised in an unconventional and matriarchal Louisiana family. They went against the era’s racist society and used her own life experiences to embody her feminist views like in her story. The story mirrors the life of Chopin’s mother. It’s also about her own liberation.

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Guy de Maupassant was a French author of the naturalistic school who is generally considered the greatest French short story writer(http://www.online-literature.com/maupassant/).He suffered in his twenty’s from syphilis which is a bacterial infection usually from sexual contact that starts out as a painless sore. The disease later caused an increasing mental disorder. Critics have charted his illness through his semi-autobiographical stories of abnormal psychology. Th…