The Shift to Savages

We all can be savages at some point in our life. It’s not every day we do so. Why? Because we are in a civilized society. In the book Lord Of The Flies a few kids can go from sweet and innocent to evil little savages. In the novel Lord Of The Flies, by William Golding “the shift to savagery” can be proved through loss of civilization, violent acts and killing.

There are many different ways that the shift to savagery is lost through civilization. For Example, in the reading Lord of the Flies the boys on the island call a gathering. They all come together and talk about the beastie, but then someone thought it was a ghost. There’s a big panic and Piggy’s says, “What are we? Humans? Or animals? Or savages? What grownups going to think? Going off-hunting pigs, -letting fires out” (91). What’s going on at that moment is

Piggy is yelling at the boys for being childish. This can be interpreted aswhat it really means is Piggy is trying to be the adult and the kids aren’t listening to the person in charge. This proves the start of savagery, because they aren’t trying to stay together and listen to each other. So the boys are all together and playing on the island playing.Ralph had just finished blowing the conch for an assembly. Then according to the author, “the choir, noticeably less of a group, had discarded their cloaks” (32). The choir had less clothing on as they did when they were first on

the island. They took most of their clothes which equals losing a sense of civilization. They aren’t trying to be civilized anymore and civilization is being lost. This is not the only shift to savagery that takes place in the novel the next is through violent acts.

The other shift to savagery is through violent acts. Now the boys are in the forest hunting a pig. They are running with spears ready to throw them at the pig so Golding says, “They could see her now, nearly got up with her, but she spurted with her last…