Many in sub-Saharan Africa, and over 300 million

Many countries in the world lack access to energy. They cannot fuel things that people in richer countries often take for granted; things such as lights, stores, and homes. Piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity can be implemented in these areas to solve this problem. These forms of electricity can generate electricity from common objects. Piezoelectricity is the electric charge that accumulates in certain objects in response to applied mechanical stress. Pyroelectricity is electricity that is produced when a certain object is heated or cooled. These forms of energy harnessing can get power to people who do not have access to electricity. Can piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity be implemented in areas without access to electricity to bring electricity to these areas?The population of people without electricity is very large. 1.3 billion people of 7.2 billion to be exact (as of 2015). This is a growing problem, especially in countries with a rapidly growing population, such as Asian countries like China or India, or African countries, such as Nigeria, or Uganda. An estimated 79% of people in the 50 poorest nations (called Third World nations) do not access to electricity, despite decades of development work within and between countries. The total number of individuals without electricity is about 1.3 billion, or one fourth of the world’s population, concentrated mostly in Africa and southern Asia. (Gronewold, 2009). Worldwide, 1.3 billion people do not have access to electricity. Over 600 million of those people are located in sub-Saharan Africa, and over 300 million of those people are located in India. (Lindeman, 2015). In sub-Saharan Africa, the rate of accessible electricity in urban areas is 60 percent, compared with only 14 percent in rural areas. At least 50 percent of the entire populations in 38 of the 49 sub-Saharan countries live without electricity — worse off, 51.4 million of 54.3 million people (94.7 percent) living in Liberia, South Sudan, Central African Republic, Chad, Sierra Leone and Malawi do not have access to electricity. (Lindeman, 2015). The electricity needs of countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and other places must be filled. Because of the lack of electricity, many people are living, reading, studying, learning, and more, in their dimly lit homes, without power. Living in an area that does not have access to electricity can have many effects on the people living in that area. The effect can vary greatly, sometimes based on the amount of money the country has and the location of the country. In Kenya, for example, only 25% of health facilities have a reliable energy supply and experience regular blackouts. (Shearlaw, 2013).”Lacking access to electricity affects health, well-being and income,” says Fatih Birol, the chief economist of the International Energy Agency (IEA). “It’s a problem the world has to pay attention to.” (Walsh, 2011). There are health costs from burning kerosene, the primary source of light for 43% of rural India. Baburam (a villager of Sadikpur, a village in India with a population of under 3,000) says fumes from kerosene and wood burning indoors “burn our eyes” and “we cannot breathe.” Kerosene fires and explosions are well-documented. Less known are the hazards from kerosene combustion. (McCarthy, 2015) There are many costs to not having electricity. In some cases, electricity is a vital part of life. There are forms of electricity that can be implemented in the areas that lack access to electricity. Piezoelectricity, also called the piezoelectric effect, is the ability of certain materials to generate an AC (alternating current) voltage when subjected to mechanical stress or vibration, or to vibrate when subjected to an AC voltage, or both. The most common piezoelectric material is quartz. Certain ceramics, Rochelle salts, and various other solids also exhibit this effect. (Rouse, 2016) Pyroelectricity is a scientific phenomenon that allows special materials to create electricity when they change temperature. Minerals and crystals are the most common substances to produce this effect. (Arie, 2018) Some of the applications for Piezoelectricity are: air bag sensor, air flow sensor, audible alarms, fuel atomiser, keyless door entry, seat belt buzzers, knock sensors, computer disc drives, inkjet printers, cigarette lighters, depth finders, fish finders, humidifiers, jewellery cleaners, musical instruments, speakers, telephone disposable patient monitors, fetal heart monitors, ultrasonic imaging, depth sounders, guidance systems, hydrophones, and sonar. (University of Liverpool, n.d.). Piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity can both be used to bring electricity to places without electricity. Piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity can be implemented in areas which lack access to electricity to solve the problem of lack of electricity. These forms of electricity can generate electricity from common objects. Piezoelectricity is the electric charge that found in certain objects in response to applied mechanical stress. Pyroelectricity is electricity that is produced when a certain object’s temperature is changed. These forms of energy harnessing can get power to people who do not have access to electricity. Can piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity be implemented in areas without access to electricity to bring electricity to areas without electricity?