How did Simon Ladivskie come to live at 115 Red Bank, Manchester

From the census returns of 1881, I found out that Simon Ladivskie was from Poland. He had a wife, age twenty-two, a son, age three and a daughter who was four months old.

Ladivskie was twenty-five when this census was taken which is quite young to have a family. The family must have been living in Lancashire, most likely Manchester for at least three years because their son was born in Lancashire. The slum area of Red Bank was poor, an unpleasant area and the houses were often shared. Ladivskie shared a house with two other families making up eleven people living together in a small, cramped, back-to-back house.Most of the Jews that had moved to Manchester and even more to Red Bank were mainly from Poland, Russia or other parts of Eastern Europe.

These Jews were the ancestors of those that lived in the Turkish Empire. Since thousands of years ago, the Jews have been punished because of their status and religion. When Jesus died on the cross, the people blamed all the Jews for his death. The Jews do not believe that Jesus is the Son of God. Other religions hate the Jews because they stand up to what they believe in.Ever since Jesus died the Jews have been blamed for his death repeatedly, even so much so that they have been forced out of some countries they were living in and punished. The two main reasons for the Jews immigrating to Manchester were because of poverty and persecution. The Jews had to escape from poverty because they were penniless and did not own anything.

They struggled to pay rent and did not have any money for food. Nobody would give them jobs or support because they were Jews so all the Jews had to depend upon each other.The Jews also had to escape from atrocities as being killed.

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The Jews also suffered from persecution. They were bullied and stopped from doing things just because they were Jews. The government had passed laws such as a certain percentage of Jews were not allowed to carry on in further education, to go to University, they were not allowed to sell trade on Sunday which used to be the busiest day and as the years went by less and less Jews were allowed to attend schools. I found this information from a source sheet. It also claimed that the Jews were involved in pogroms.

Civil authorities did not allow the attacks on the Jews, this caused a huge uproar and disturbance, making some Jews escape from terror. The Jews had to find a place, which would benefit their needs. Manchester obviously was the place for them. The Jews needed a job, in which thousands were available in Manchester because hundreds of factories had just opened due industrialisation. Many rich Jews had already been settled in Manchester so they had set up a Jewish community, which consisted of their regular needs, e.

g. synagogues.The Jews that already lived there were the Polish ancestors. The Polish Jews were helped a great deal because with a community set up, contacts in which they could easily reach with able communication and custom, thousands of jobs being offered, these Jews had everything they needed. At first, the Jews were supposed to be stopping at Manchester until they earned enough money to travel to America.

The Jews wanted to live In America originally because it was known as the promise land, a place with wealth and an amazing country to live in.My views on Simon Ladivskie living in Red Bank show that the main reason he lived in this slum area was because he was poor. A family of four would not choose to live with two other families of two and five members because there would not be enough room. Mr Ladivskie was clearly poor in my view. As the head of his family he would clearly want the best for them, this shows that Red Bank was the only place he could afford, costing the little price of twelve and a half pence per week.

If Mr Ladivskie was rich, he would be living in Hightown.This offered a nicer area and a terraced house of their own which wouldn’t be cramped. The only reason why I feel Simon Ladivskie would want to live in Red Bank is because it is close to communal facilities and the station. There is also another benefit of living at 115 Red Bank; this would be the community that lived around there. Mr Ladivskie shared a house with two other Polish families who were most likely in the same situation as him. This would benefit the families because they were all from the same background, they all speak the same language as each other and could offer support to one another.They would offer support because as Polish Families they are all sharing the same experience and would be able to understand what each family were going through.

From all the information I have gathered, I can evaluate that Simon Ladivskie lived at 115 Red Bank for several reasons. Poverty and persecution are the main reasons for leaving the country he used to live in. I think he moved to Manchester because there was a lot to offer and because there was already a Jewish community set up, he knew that he was welcome because of the amount of Jews already living there.There were also jobs in Manchester and support from other Jews. Living in Red Bank would mainly break down to the money problem because all people that live in the slum, dirty area of Red Bank were struggling to make any money and were desperate. I can conclude that Simon Ladivskie was living at 115 Red Bank because he was poor and struggling to earn a lot of money.

He was a tailor, which did not have a great wage, and he was the only person that worked out of his family of four because his wife obviously had to look after the young children.