Emotions in Fahrenheit 451

Fahrenheit 451 written by Ray Bradbury is a masterpiece at telling the future for their period. This book is about a corrupt society that is based around the idea that everyone should have equal intelligence and books are not allowed. In this book, there are intense moments in which Guy Montag, the main character, has high emotional feelings throughout the book because of his job as a fireman. Instead of putting out fires, he uses the fire to burn books because owning a book is against the law. Books are against the law because many people are offended by the books. At high emotional moments, there are many flame words such as hot, burn, heat, and fire that demonstrate sadness, corruption on society, and anger.

Overall, the entire book applies sadness to create the mood. When there are moments of sadness, there are moments of fire. The first time that fire is used to demonstrate sadness iswhen the reader can almost feel time slow down as a woman would not give up her books and she tells the firemen, “To burn her books she would have to get burnt herself” (37). Montag, with great hesitation, burns the woman. He is just doing his job. The sadness in the flames is a key way of showing Montag’s emotional state without actually saying it. His emotional state is shock and doubt. He is in doubt because he does not feel like he is doing the right thing. “You weren’t there, you didn’t see [ . . . . ] There must be something in books, things we can’t imagine, to make a woman stay in a burning house; there must be something there. You don’t stay for nothing” (48). Montag still questions whether he did the right thing or not represented in words that relate to fire about what he did to that woman. Montag talks about why she would risk her life for books, and it begins to make Montag realize the sad truth in what he did. Burning creates serious sadness in the time that Fahrenheit 451 takes place, and it is proven with Montag’s feeli…