Decision Making in Literature

Throughout life, one must make decisions in order to move on with life. While making these choices, it could lead to many possibilities, problems, or back to a closed door. These decisions can help morally evolve characters in reality and fictionally. In the short story, “The Story of an Hour,” Mrs. Mallard is struggling with what to do with her life after the death of her husband. In addition, the barber in “Just Lather, That’s All”, is battling with the resolution of killing Captain Torres, a man who is feared by many.

The barber and Mrs. Mallard face situations never experienced that create an important internal conflict that has the ability to fundamentally change their morality and character. Mrs.

Mallard from “The Story of an Hour,” is force to deal with the death of her husband which leads to her inner conflict. In the beginning, Mrs. Mallard is described “with a paralyzed inability to accept its significance.” (Chopin 1). Along with the loss of her husband, it brought grief and abandonment to her life. Mrs.

Mallard is having trouble to accept the loss of her spouse only before she gazed out an open window. Chopin introduces this when she writes, “Whose gaze was fixed away off yonder on one of those patches of blue sky. It was not a glance of reflection, but rather indicated a suspension of intelligent thought.” (Chopin 1). Mrs.

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Mallard is given the realization that there’s more to life than grieving for her husband which leads to the inner-battle she has within herself. While being presented the option to freedom, Mrs. Mallard is struggling between liberation and pushing aside life after marriage. Through self-discovery, she develops a new understanding of life and learns “beyond that bitter moment a long procession of years to come that would belong to her absolutely.

” (Chopin 2). By allowing her thoughts to wander, Mrs. Mallard slowly begins to accept the concept of freedom, something she’s ne…