Authenticity and Tuesdays with Morrie

Authenticity, defined by todays society and public figures, cannot be attained in someone’s everyday life. Being authentic to most people means to be truthful, self accepting, and caring. That is not authentic, that is what society interprets as authentic. In the novel Tuesdays With Morrie a man named Mitch, a college graduate tied up in his career, comes to his old professor Morrie after finding out he has ALS. Mitch Albom shares the true story of Morrie and his experiences as his loved professor faces death. Michael Jackson, who at one point of his life was hated by society said, “I’m happy to be alive, I’m happy to be who I am.” Although it seems “cliche” to call this authentic Michael is staying true to himself and living life how he pleases, not how society wants him too. This is something everyone should work on, including my self, because at the end of the day the only one who can never leave an individual is that individual.

A big part of being “authentic” is to be original. Herman Melville had said, “It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.” Originality can be taken too far at times. The point isn’t to be original towards personally making the clothing people wear, or the music they listen too, but for the reasons they choose to do so. Authenticity has nothing to do with designing the clothes we wear, or whether or not we compose our own music, it’s about not letting “the system” control the thoughts produced by our society. If someone follows every trend because everyone else is doing it, they aren’t being authentic, they’re being a follower. Being original towards personal thought is what is “authentic.”

Self acceptance and self realisation are primary components of authenticity as well.Psychiatrist, Carl Gustav (C.G.) Jung once said, “The Privilege of a lifetime is to become who you truly are.” If society cannot realize their self made purpose and accept th…